Raising Entrepreneurial Girls

THE SEVEN BEST BOOKS TO TEACH KIDS ABOUT ECONOMICS AND MONEY

Uncover your girl’s inner entrepreneur with these books about business basics and money matters  

Money matters! Plus, economics makes the world go round. And the sooner your girl understands these business concepts and learns how money is earned, budgeted, saved, invested, and spent, the better she appreciates the value of a dollar. Best of all, it’s an appreciation that, well, appreciates over time. Every time your girl independently makes financial decisions about the money she earns from chores, gifts, or allowances, she forms smart money habits that stick! Recognizing a buck’s value and getting comfortable with everyday finance can also stir your girl’s entrepreneurial spirit. So, why not nurture this? Start by having an honest conversation with your girl about money and explaining that it’s never too early to think about jobs or an entrepreneurial career. You can also read books about economics and money with her. We have a few in mind, so check out our suggestions below.

Moneybunny: Picture Books by Cinders McLeod

Recommended for ages 3+. Each book from the Moneybunny picture book series, Earn It!, Spend It!, Save It!, and Give It! teaches kids basic financial literacy. Thanks to the bunny residents of Bunnyland, young readers of the series learn that anything’s possible when they make wise money choices and give delayed gratification a chance. Different money lessons in the books also encourage kids to embrace the joys of budgeting and charitable giving.

Tia Isa Wants A Car by Meg Medina, Illustrated by Claudio Munoz

Recommended for ages 3 to 7. An award-winning story about working to achieve what others think impossible. The protagonist’s aunt needs money to buy a car so her niece picks up some odd jobs to help her aunt save up for the car that no one thought she would ever be able to afford.

The Startup Squad: Face the Music (Book 2) by Brian Weisfeld and Nicole C. Kear

Recommended for ages 7 to 14. Harriet’s brothers are hoping to enter a local battle of the bands. Winning could get them on a reality TV show! But low funds have left them without even a working guitar. The Startup Squad jumps into action—and quickly pulls together a plan to sell T-shirts to raise money. Like the other two books in The Startup Squad series, Face the Music (Book #2) features helpful startup tips for budding young entrepreneurs and a profile of an real-life successful girlpreneur.

Cleo Edison Oliver, Playground Millionaire by Sundee T. Frazier

Recommended for ages 8-12. Fun story about the adventures and misadventures of a business-obsessed girl and natural born salesperson whose initials spell “CEO.” When Cleo’s fifth-grade teacher assigns the class a “Passion Project,” Cleo decides to start Cleo’s Quick and Painless Tooth Removal Service – using her brother’s nerf gun to pull teeth so kids can get their Tooth Fairy money early. The book includes business principles from Cleo’s idol Fortune A. Davies, examples of different negotiation tactics, and countless business terms.

 

How to Turn $100 into $1,000,000: Earn! Save! Invest! by James McKenna, Jeannine Glista, and Matt Fontaine

Recommended for ages 10 – 14. This book includes a thorough yet easy-to-understand introduction to finance and everyday money strategies. From setting goals to getting a business off the ground, the book’s chapters clearly explain how your girl can invest her earnings wisely and the steps she needs to take to become a bona fide financial whiz kid.

Bee Fearless by Mikaila Ulmer

Recommended for ages 10+. Mikaila Ulmer is a fifteen-year-old lemonade entrepreneur who shares her advice for life and business in this business memoir. Mikaila started her business at age 4 and grew it to become one of the most successful kid-started businesses ever. In Bee Fearless, Mikaila shares the story of her journey and offers tips and guidance for young entrepreneurs who want to follow in her footsteps.

Economix: How and Why Our Economy Works (and Doesn’t Work) in Words and Pictures by Michael Goodwin

Recommended for ages 12+. The comic book format of Economix: How and Why Our Economy Works (and Doesn’t Work) in Words and Pictures makes it easier for 7th graders and up to grasp the often complex issues of economics. By covering concepts like how the country’s financial health (macroeconomics) can affect a neighborhood bookstore (microeconomics) and making the topics more practical, this graphic novel simplifies the connection between economics and everyday life for young readers.

 

Entertaining (and educational) stories about saving, investing, and profit-making can definitely make the world of finance a lot less scary for kids and teens. These great books about economics and money can also encourage your girl to envision a bright financial future for herself, wherever her passions may lead her. And even if your girl gives entrepreneurship a try only for the summer, it’s worth it! Every startup provides a springboard to your girl’s life skills and healthy relationship with money.

 

 

 

 

 

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